PhD Scientific Days 2018

Budapest, April 19–20, 2018

Pavlovian conditioning on the wheel

Sviatkó, Katalin

1 Katalin Sviatkó, Lendület Laboratory of Systems Neuroscience,Department of Cellular and Network Neurobiology, Institute of Experimental Medicine – Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest,H-1083, Hungary; János Szentágothai Doctoral School of Neurosciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest, H-1085, Hungary
2 András Széll, Department of Measurement and Information Systems, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, H-1117, Hungary;
3 Panna Hegedüs, Lendület Laboratory of Systems Neuroscience,Department of Cellular and Network Neurobiology, Institute of Experimental Medicine – Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest,H-1083, Hungary; Semmelweis University, Budapest, H-1085, Hungary;
4 Eszter Ujvári, Lendület Laboratory of Systems Neuroscience,Department of Cellular and Network Neurobiology, Institute of Experimental Medicine – Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest,H-1083,Hungary; Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus London SW7 2AZ, UK;
5 Joshua I Sanders, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724 USA; The Danish Research Institute of Translational Neuroscience, Aarhus University, Ole Worms Alle 3, Bygning 1171, Aarhus 8000, Denmark;
6 Balázs Hangya, Lendület Laboratory of Systems Neuroscience,Department of Cellular and Network Neurobiology, Institute of Experimental Medicine – Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest,H-1083, Hungary;

Language of the presentation

English

Text of the abstract

Cortical processing strongly depends on brain states, which in turn influences animal behavior. Brain states are controlled by the coordinated activity of multiple subcortical neuromodulatory centers. Of these centers the basal forebrain projection system is thought to play roles in regulating cortical processing and plasticity. It has widespread cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic projections which are thought to mediate multiple cognitive functions including learning and attention. From among these parallel projections, glutamatergic neurons have been implicated in controlling the locomotion-related theta oscillation in the medial septum-diagonal band complex. On the other hand, the cholinergic cells respond rapidly and reliably to the reinforcement likely important for learning. Therefore we hypothesize a relationship between basal forebrain neuronal activity, locomotion and learning.
To directly test this hypothesis, mice were placed on a wheel and trained on an auditory pavlovian cued outcome task. We measured how well mice learned the task by observing anticipatory licking after the tone predicting the likely reward. This experimental design places no constraints on mouse locomotion, allowing the subject to run or stand in place at will. It is therefore possible to examine whether there are correlated changes in basal forebrain neuronal activity, behavioral performance and learning across the ‘standing still’ and running states.
We use an affordable, modular, open source system capable of flexible behavioral task design and execution, submillisecond precision hardware control, combined neural recordings and optogenetic stimulation. For speed measurement we used a rotary encoder with Arduino Due. For this we developed a Matlab interface by which we are able to follow the current position of the encoder, current distance and speed as well as calculate the average speed and position.
We believe that examining the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons from this new approach will provide more detailed information about how these cells’-function in the learning process.

Data of the presenter

János Szentágothai Doctoral School of Neurosciences

03. Functional Neurosciences

Balázs Hangya

sviatko.katalin@koki.mta.hu