PhD Scientific Days 2019

Budapest, April 25–26, 2019

Dichotomy in the frontal thalamocortical system

Magyar, Aletta

1 Magyar Aletta, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for Natural Sciences,Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Neuronal Network and Behavior Research Group, Budapest, Hungary
János Szentágothai Doctoral School of Neurosciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
2 Kocsis KInga, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for Natural Sciences,Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Neuronal Network and Behavior Research Group, Budapest, Hungary
Roska Tamás Doctoral School of Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest Hungary
3 Költő Karola, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for Natural Sciences,Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Neuronal Network and Behavior Research Group, Budapest, Hungary
Eötvös Lorand University, Faculty of Science, Budapest, Hungary
4 Babiczky Ákos, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for Natural Sciences,Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Neuronal Network and Behavior Research Group, Budapest, Hungary
Doctoral School of Psychology (Cognitive Science), Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
5 Szabó Mónika, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for Natural Sciences,Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Neuronal Network and Behavior Research Group, Budapest, Hungary
Eötvös Lorand University, Faculty of Science, Budapest, Hungary
6 Fiáth Richárd, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudósok körútja 2, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary
Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Práter utca 50/A, H-1083 Budapest, Hungary
7 Yizhar Ofer, Department of Neurobiology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
8 Mátyás ferenc, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for Natural Sciences,Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology, Neuronal Network and Behavior Research Group, Budapest, Hungary
Dept. of Anatomy and Histology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary

Language of the presentation

Hungarian

Text of the abstract

Introduction: The medial thalamic influence over frontal cortex (FC) plays important role in many cognitive functions. This network is built-up by parallel thalamocortical routes providing complex computation leading to cognition.
Aims: Recently, by classifying the calretinin-expressing and non-expressing midline thalamic population (CR+/CR- MT) with distinct arousal-related activity (Matyas, Komlosi et al, 2018), we have proposed a view of dichotomy in this network.
Method: Here, we performed cell-type specific anatomical and electrophysiological approaches to dissect the CR+ and CR- thalamocortical (TC) systems. By injecting a Cre-dependent AAVs together with a novel viral construct, which selectively infect Cre-positive and -negative thalamic cells in CR-cre mice, we mapped the topography of these CR+ and CR-TC axons (respectively) with regional-selectivity.
Results: The two population formed a rather non-overlapping cortical innervation. CR+ cells preferentially targeted prelimbic, infralmibic, orbital and insular cortices while CR- ones, cingulate and secondary cortical areas. In addition, their subcortical projections were also distinct in the field of the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, lateral septum, hypothalamus, dorsal striatum, bed nucleus of stria terminalis. Multisite in vivo recordings from frontal and parietal cortices along with thalamic optogenetic activation are designed to compare the cellular (multi-unit activity) as well as network (local field potential) – local and global – effects of CR+ and CR- TC cells.
Conclusion: Our preliminary data shows that the two thalamic population provide qualitatively and quantitatively distinct cortical excitation, propagating differently to the parietal cortical regions. These findings indicate the dual nature of the frontal thalamocortical system which may fulfil different role in cognition.

Data of the presenter

Doctoral School: János Szentágothai Doctoral School of Neurosciences, Semmelweis University
Program: Functional Neurosciences
Supervisor: Ferenc Mátyás
E-mail address: magyaraletta92@gmail.com
poster presentation