PhD Scientific Days 2019

Budapest, April 25–26, 2019

The impact of Sex, Age and Training on Biventricular Cardiac Adaptation in Healthy Athletes measured by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Csecs, Ibolya

1 Ibolya Csecs, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
2 Csilla Czimbalmos, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
3 Attila Toth, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
4 Zsofia Dohy, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
5 Imre F Suhai, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
6 Liliana Szabo, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
7 Attila Kovacs, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
8 Balint Lakatos, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
9 Nora Sydo, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
10 Orsolya Kiss, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
11 Bela Merkely, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
12 Hajnalka Vago, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary

Language of the presentation

Hungarian

Text of the abstract

Background and Aim: Physiological cardiac adaptation in athletes is influenced by multiple factors. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of gender, age, sport type and training hours on cardiac adaptation in a large cohort of healthy athlete with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging.

Methods: A total of 327 athletes (242 male, 21±6 years) underwent CMR scan. Left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) ejection fractions (EF), end-diastolic (EDV), end-systolic (ESV), stroke (SV) volumes and masses (M) were measured. Athletes were categorized according to the static and dynamic components of their primary sport. LVEDV/LVM and RVEDV/RVM were calculated, and derived LV/RV ratios were determined to study balanced ventricular adaptation.

Results: Male sex, older age, higher weekly training hours, and high dynamic high static (HDHS) or high dynamic mid static (HDMS) sport predicted higher LVEDV, RVEDV, LVM and RVM (p<0.05 for all). Correlation was found between LVM and male sex (r= -0.507 p<0.0001), and between LVM and training hours (r=0.474 p<0.001). In a multivariate model including gender, training hours and HDHS, gender was a strong contributor: male gender associated with higher masses [+58g LVM and +16g RVM; +22g LVMi and +6g RVMi]. The LV/RV mass and volume ratios did not correlate with age, sex, or HDHS sport, however more training associated with lower LVEDV/RVEDV (p<0.05).

Conclusions: In this study male gender, higher training volume and HDHS sport related to higher LV and RV volumes and masses. Physiological cardiac adaptation was different in male and female athletes.

Data of the presenter

Basic and Translational Medicine PhD School

Program: 1. Cardiovascular Disorders: Physiology and Medicine of Ischaemic Circulatory Diseases

Supervisors: Professor Bela Merkely and Dr. Hajnalka Vago

email: ibolyacsecs@gmail.com